New year, different perspective

I pinched the title of this post from Annie of An Unrefined Vegan, because the post she wrote on this subject rang true with me.

When I started this blog, in January 2012, I was intent on writing about tearooms and little else. For that reason the blog name I chose, Lorna’s Tearoom Delights, seemed fitting. I started the blog in tandem with a book I was writing about tearooms, and my vision for the future was a series of books about tearooms and endless blog articles on the same subject.

Recently, however, I’ve felt rather restricted by this title and that’s probably why I’ve branched out and started new blogs dedicated to different subjects. I currently have eight WordPress blogs on the go, some of which I haven’t made public, but it seems ridiculous and unnecessary to have so many.

Thanks to Annie’s post, I’ve decided it’s high time I stopped feeling restricted by Lorna’s Tearoom Delights. A number of my loyal readers have assured me in the past that they don’t mind what I write about, but I’ve always felt guilty about new people following me and expecting this blog to do what it says on the tin, so to speak.

I don’t want to lose all my followers by closing the door on Lorna’s Tearoom Delights, so I’m hoping a change in perspective won’t put too many people off.

I’ve been writing about chocolate bars on my newest blog, Any old excuse, but from now on I’m going to do my chocolate posts on this blog, along with anything else I feel like writing about.

If you follow this blog for tearooms alone, I apologise for the dearth of them lately. I can’t promise that tearooms will ever be such a feature of this blog as they were in the beginning, but since I do still enjoy visiting such places I’m sure the odd tearoom post will pop up from time to time.

Thank you to everyone who follows this blog, particularly those who’ve been dropping in for years and leaving comments. Getting to know people through blogging has been, and still is, a real pleasure. It’s something I wouldn’t want to give up now.

To finish off this post, here are the delightful assistants on a recent trip to Crieff. After a nice lunch at Crieff Hydro we took a stroll around the grounds. I led them along muddy paths and across a rocky field, made all the more interesting by low angle sunlight dazzling them as they walked. They appear to have enjoyed the element of uncertainty, which got me to thinking that perhaps there’s a gap in the market. If I were an entrepreneurial type I might start up a company running assault courses for geriatrics, but I think I’ll stick to providing the occasional treat for the assistants.

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The delightful assistants – shielding themselves from the glare, or not sure they want to see where this blog might be heading?

 

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List of books read in 2014

In response to a request from Connie in my last post, this post contains a list of the books I read last year.

Divided into fiction and non fiction, they’re listed in the order that I read them (although I jumped about between fiction and non fiction throughout the year).

Although the oldest non fiction title was published in 1997, about half of the fiction was published before that. The oldest fiction title on the list is Rudyard Kipling’s “Kim”, which was first published in 1901. This edition (below) was printed in 1957 and belonged to my grandmother.

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It’s probably not very difficult after skimming the list to guess that Agatha Christie is one of my favourite authors. I had previously read all of those on the list, bar one. I’m extremely grateful that she was so prolific, because I can read and re-read her books without returning to the same ones too soon after they were last read. There are 12 of her books on my 2014 list, and I fully anticipate devouring a similar number this year.

One of the best finds for me last year was Eric Ambler (1909-1998), who wrote spy stories. After reading “Cause for alarm”, which I came across by chance in the library, I sought out some others and three of them are on this list. I did start a fourth one that he wrote later in life, but I couldn’t get through it.

Another highlight last year was reading two creations by fellow bloggers, Shona Patel and Annie Oliverio. Shona’s book is a fictional story set in India and Annie’s is a non fiction guide to caring for someone who’s dying. I found both of these books outstandingly well written and compelling.

Fiction

“Hector and the search for happiness” by François Lelord (2002)

“Mutiny on the Bounty” by John Boyne (2008)

“Maskerade” by Terry Pratchett (1995)

“Seven dials” by Anne Perry (2003)

“Murder in the museum” by Simon Brett (2004)

“The curious incident at Claridge’s” by R T Raichev (2010)

“The scheme for full employment” by Magnus Mills (2003)

“A judgement in stone” by Ruth Rendell (1997)

“Miss Buncle’s Book” by D E Stevenson (1934)

“Teatime for the firefly” by Shona Patel (2013)

“The collected stories of Rumpole” by John Mortimer (2012)

“The affair of the bloodstained egg cosy” by James Anderson (1975)

“Five star billionaire” by Tash Aw (2013)

“The island” by Victoria Hislop (2005)

“The witness at the wedding” by Simon Brett (2005)

“Second time around” by Marcia Willett (1997)

“The house on the cliff” by D E Stevenson (1966)

“Sleeping murder” by Agatha Christie (1976)

“The best man to die” by Ruth Rendell (1969)

“Shroud for a nightingale” by P D James (1971)

“The behaviour of moths” by Poppy Adams (2008)

“Easter Island” by Jennifer Vanderbes (2003)

“Sleeping Tiger” by Rosamunde Pilcher (1967)

“Dumb witness” by Agatha Christie (1937)

“Deadline” by Barbara Nadel (2013)

“Cause for alarm” by Eric Ambler (1938)

“Cover her face” by P D James (1962)

“The good thief’s guide to Vegas” by Chris Ewan (2010)

“Skios” by Michael Frayn (2012)

“Kim” by Rudyard Kipling (1901)

“Journey into fear” by Eric Ambler (1940)

“The Bad Quarto” by Jill Paton Walsh (2007)

“Every man for himself” by Beryl Bainbridge (1996)

“Epitaph for a spy” by Eric Ambler (1938)

“Gaudy night” by Dorothy L Sayers (1935)

“The bride’s farwell” by Meg Rosoff (2009)

“Devices and desires” by P D James (1989)

“Trent’s own case” by E C Bentley and H Warner Allen (1936)

“The pale horse” by Agatha Christie (1961)

“They came to Baghdad” by Agatha Christie (1951)

“The body in the library” by Agatha Christie (1942)

“A pocket full of rye” by Agatha Christie (1953)

“A murder is announced” by Agatha Christie (1950)

“The Thief” by Ruth Rendell (2006)

“The moving finger” by Agatha Christie (1943)

“The Sittaford Mystery” by Agatha Christie (1931)

“Blood at the bookies” by Simon Brett (2008)

“Destination unknown” by Agatha Christie (1954)

“Ordeal by innocence” by Agatha Christie (1958)

“And then there were none” by Agatha Christie (1939)


Non-fiction

“Pirates, Plants and Plunder” by Stewart Ross (2005)

“The idle traveller’ by Dan Kieran (2012)

“The lost city of Z” by David Grann (2009)

“A terminal illness primer for caregivers” by Ann Oliverio (2014)

“Mindset” by Carol Dweck (2006)

“Sea legs” by Guy Grieve (2013)

“59 seconds” by Professor Richard Wiseman (2009)

“Affluenza” by Oliver James (2007)

“Arthur Conan Doyle – beyond Sherlock Holmes” by Dr Andrew Norman (2007)

“Up with the larks” by Tessa Hainsworth (2009)

“Quirkology” by Professor Richard Wiseman (2007)

“Seagulls in the attic” by Tessa Hainsworth (2010)

“Round Ireland with a fridge” by Tony Hawks (1997)

“The mould in Dr Florey’s coat” by Eric Lax (2004)

“Screw it, let’s do it” by Richard Branson (2006)

“Himalaya” by Michael Palin (2004)

*   *   *   *   *

This morning I finished a non fiction book I started reading a couple of weeks ago. Having got into the habit of keeping a note of books last year I might as well carry on and see if I can do it for two years running.

Thanks to Professor Richard Wiseman, my year got off to a spooky start with the book below. I like a bit of the paranormal now and then, so I’m hoping for a few more ghoulish surprises in the next 12 months.

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Enter 2015

I was inspired the other day by reading a post by fellow blogger, Darlene Foster, about building on the success of 2014. (You can read it by clicking on her name.)

In the post she details the goals she set herself for 2014, and reports on how she got on with them.

Towards the end of December 2013,  I did a post about my resolutions for the coming year. My main aim was to keep a note of all the books I read throughout 2014.

I started a blog about it, which I made private after a while to take the pressure off having to write decent English, and I’m pleased to report that I managed to stick to my goal.

I was hoping for a minimum of 60 books, and by last night my final count was 66, with more than three times as many fiction as non fiction. I had imagined the split would be more equal, but since I’m attempting to get my own stories published, perhaps it’s advisable to spend more time immersed in fictional worlds.

On that topic, I entered a number of short story competitions last year, none of which I won. I also failed to get any stories published in magazines that I submitted to. I felt despondent at the time, but now that we’re starting a new year I’m putting all that behind me and cracking on with more writing, in the hope that one of these days I’ll produce something publishable.

When it comes to resolutions and, for that matter, daily ‘to-do’ lists, it’s helpful to throw in some easily achievable targets alongside the more challenging ones, which leads me to my other main goal for 2015.

As mentioned in a previous post, I’m aiming to consume at least 52 different chocolate confections throughout the year and write about them on one of my other blogs, Any Old Excuse. I’ve posted about a few already, as a sort of warm-up act.

Whatever your goals or ambitions for 2015, I wish you well with them and hope that the coming year is full of pleasant events that cheer and comfort you.

Happy new year!

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I’m looking forward to seeing some spring flowers, like these beauties outside the excellent Storehouse of Foulis near Dingwall (top tip for lunch if you’re ever in that neck of the woods needing refreshments).

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Merry Christmas

This summer, when I took a break from blogging, I was expecting to spend a few months concentrating on writing fiction. When my brother Fergus went missing in September those plans went awry.

Having a member of your family suddenly disappear without trace has a range of unexpected repercussions. It’s now over three months since Fergus vanished in Switzerland and we still don’t know what happened to him, or indeed whether he’s alive or dead. It’s strange being in limbo, not knowing if he will ever come back, but sadly after this length of time I’ve come to the conclusion that he won’t.

For the past few weeks my dad and I have been going down to Edinburgh as often as we can to try and sort things out at Fergus’s flat. There is much to do and I imagine that this situation will dominate our lives well into the coming year.

Although I have been visiting tearooms during this process, I haven’t had the energy or inclination to photograph and review them. However, as a small distraction for myself I’ve set up a new blog called Any old excuse.

On this new blog I aim to review at least one item of chocolate-based confectionery a week. 

Tea and chocolate, two of the things that make life worth living.

Click on the picture above to find chocolate posts in 2015.

I appreciate that reading reviews of chocolate isn’t everyone’s idea of a good way to spend their time, especially if they don’t actually get any chocolate out of it. I’ve disabled comments to make it easier for me to manage, but if you ever feel like dropping by it would be lovely to have your company.

In the meantime, to all my wonderful fellow bloggers, readers and chums:

A very happy Christmas and new year,
and many good things to come in 2015.

Six wee dogs hoping for Christmas treats under the tree.

Six little dogs hoping for Christmas treats under the tree.

Categories: Blogging, Chocolate, Photography, Scotland, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , , | 49 Comments

Fergus McInnes

By brother, Fergus McInnes, went missing in Geneva, Switzerland, on Tuesday 9 September 2014.

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Fergus walking in the hills, one of his many hobbies.

He was due to attend a work conference in the Swiss town of Martigny the following day, and to meet his colleagues that evening for a meal.

He boarded the 09:35 EasyJet flight at Edinburgh airport and was seen on CCTV in Geneva airport around 13:00, where he bought a train ticket that we believe was a return to Martigny.

Nothing has been seen of him since.

He did not arrive at the meeting point that evening to go for a meal, he did not check into his hotel room and he did not appear at the conference. He also failed to catch his return flight to Edinburgh on 11 September.

His mobile phone has not been switched on since he switched it off for the flight, nor has he checked his emails since the morning of Tuesday 9 September. The last bank transaction he made was the purchase of a train ticket in Geneva airport when he used a debit card.

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CCTV picture of Fergus at Geneva Airport on 9 September 2014.

One of his colleagues who attended the conference in Martigny reported him missing to the Scottish Police, and they launched a missing person inquiry. Shortly after that it became a separate Swiss inquiry, and both inquiries are ongoing.

We are all utterly mystified about his disappearance and, with a lack of clues about where he might have gone or what might have happened to him, we fall back on endless and wide-ranging theories.

Friends of his have set up a blog called Missing Fergus McInnes, to keep people updated on the investigation into his disappearance. You can get to it by clicking on the blog name below:

 

Missing Fergus McInnes

 

They are monitoring all comments, and passing anything that might be relevant on to the police.

Fergus headshot 2009

It’s now been over three weeks since he disappeared and, despite media campaigns in Switzerland and France, as well as in the UK, there is no indication of where he might be.

The blog contains a list of unanswered questions, which we dearly wish we could get answers to.

The police in both Switzerland and Scotland are doing all they can to discover what happened to him after he was last seen in Geneva.

We remain hopeful of a good outcome.

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Family gathering (Fergus top left).

 

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Thank you and goodnight

Much as I enjoy lounging around in the blogosphere – reading other people’s blogs as well as writing my own – it does take up a considerable amount of time.

Sometimes one has to let go of one thing in order to take hold of another, and so it is that I’m taking a sabbatical from this blog in order to attend to other things.

A big thank you to all the tearooms that have provided much of this blog’s fodder, to everyone who’s read my posts and to those who have been so loyal with their comments. Thanks also to all my fellow bloggers who have provided me with such entertaining and stimulating reading material on their own blogs.

I wish you all the very best in the meantime, and look forward to a reunion in the future (with scones).

– Lorna

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A treacle scone recently consumed at Woodlea Tearoom, Sandhead.

Categories: Blogging, Scone, Writing | Tags: , , , , , , | 66 Comments

The Wee Blether

Not only is the title of this post a Scottish expression meaning ‘the small talkative one’, it’s also the name of a tearoom that sits in a little village along a dead end road on the north bank of Loch Ard near Aberfoyle in Scotland.

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A side wall of the Wee Blether tearoom and post office, Kinlochard.

The tearoom is a most interesting place, with plenty both outside and inside to draw the attention.

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERALots of teapots hang outside the tearoom, a situation that apparently came about by a happy mistake.

Hoping to make a sculpture from broken bits of pottery, the owner asked people for donations of their old teapots, but was given such a plethora of fine pots in good condition that she abandoned the idea of smashing them up, and instead slung them onto hooks around the building.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThere’s seating inside and out, and on a warm sunny day you might imagine you were somewhere a little more exotic than bonnie Scotland.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAInside, the tearoom has a friendly, welcoming feel and, naturally enough, more teapots.

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After consuming jacket potatoes with very generous salads, my delightful assistant and I tottered out into the sunshine for a short walk to work up our appetites for sweet treats.

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Loch Ard, near Aberfoyle.

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Carved owls in a garden in the village of Kinlochard.

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Burgeoning foliage, Kinlochard.

Back in the Wee Blether, we turned to the ‘Ye Shouldnaes’ [things you shouldn’t indulge in] section of the menu:

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMy delightful assistant was particularly attracted by a three-layer Victoria sponge filled with raspberries and cream.

It was served freshly stabbed, giving the fork little chance of sliding off the plate onto the floor.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI was very taken with this arrangement, and can imagine how satisfying it must be for the waitress to plunge a fork into each slice of cake ordered. If I worked at the Wee Blether I would go out of my way to recommend sponge cakes to customers.

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Scones, on the other hand, don’t come with forks but at the Wee Blether they come in a very decent size (£10 note for scale):

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My scone was so large that I initially cut it in two intending to take half of it away in the napkin, but, what do you know, when it was time to leave the whole thing had mysteriously vamooshed.

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A large scone – now you see it, now you don’t.

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Categories: Cake, Gardens, Perthshire, Photography, Scone, Scotland, Stirlingshire, Teapot, Tearooms | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 46 Comments

A foreign land

A couple of weeks ago the delightful assistants and I went off on an excursion to a foreign land.

Not all that different from Scotland, it must be said, the land in question being the first stop south over the border: England.

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Our destination was the island of Lindisfarne (aka Holy Island), off the Northumberland coast.

One of the exciting things about going to Lindisfarne is that you have to drive through the sea to get there:

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Having consulted the tide tables before setting off, I’m happy to report that we avoided the above predicament.

We drove along an exposed strip of tarmac that wound its way across the sand and mud flats to the island. It felt quite exciting, knowing that a few hours later the road would be under the sea.

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It having been quite a long drive from sunny Perthshire, we were ready for a spot of luncheon and opted for al fresco paninis in the garden of the Pilgrim’s Coffee House:

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The sign outside very helpfully informed canine patrons of the facilities:

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To digress for a moment, this reminds me of a sign that was stuck up outside my local Catholic church. It said something like ‘No dog fouling’ and had been attached to a railing, not at eye height for humans, but a few inches off the ground at a position I can only assume was aimed at the dog rather than the owner.

Back at the Pilgrim’s Coffee House a dog sat quietly, not checking his email but gratefully accepting pieces of scone laden with jam and cream. Sadly, I didn’t get a picture of the treats, but here he is sitting nicely:

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The island measures 2.25 miles from east to west and 1.5 miles north to south.

We concentrated our wanderings on the village area, which has a surprising amount to offer visitors.

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One of the streets in Lindisfarne.

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Entrance to the parish church of St Mary the Virgin.

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Inside the church: six wooden monks carrying a coffin.

The sculpture above depicts St Cuthbert’s body being removed from the island during Viking raids in 793 AD.

St Cuthbert is the patron saint of the north of England and was at one time the Bishop of Lindisfarne. He’s a particularly interesting saint, one of the curious things about him being that when his sarcophagus was opened some years after his death, his body was found to be in tip-top condition.

Right next to the parish church are the remains of Lindisfarne Priory, seen below with the church on the left and Lindisfarne Castle in the distance on the right.

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From left to right: church, priory and castle.

We didn’t have time to visit the castle, but I would like to pop down and look round it on another occasion. It was built in the 16th century and sits on the highest point in the island.

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Lindisfarne Castle seen from the churchyard of St Mary the Virgin.

The weather was lovely, with hazy sunshine all day.

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Delightful assistants soaking up the sun in a public garden.

Once we had wearied ourselves of walking, and despite the temptations of staying on the island….

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…we scooted back across the sea and, not far over the border into Scotland, happened upon a delightful refreshment stop in the small town of Coldstream.

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Stanwins Coffee Lounge, on the High Street in Coldstream.

We were gasping for beverages and I was delighted to find that Stanwins offered Lady Grey leaf tea, something I don’t see as often as I’d like to.

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Delightful assistants happily awaiting treats.

The cafe had a Scandinavian feel, with a Danish poster on the wall and fresh, neutral decor.  The lovely lady who served us said her husband was Danish and instead of the usual toasties for lunch, they offered open sandwiches and other Scandinavian-inspired fare.

I don’t think any of the things we had were particularly Scandinavian, but they were jolly tasty.

I had an enormous toasted teacake with Lady Grey tea, delightful assistant no.2 had shortbread and a cappuccino, and delightful assistant no.1 went for a slice of Swiss roll and a pot of breakfast tea. This was the Swiss roll, which was apparently delicious:

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We all enjoyed our trip to Lindisfarne, and hope to go again one of these days.

Perhaps, if the next visit is post-referendum*, I might get an English stamp in my passport.

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Grassy path, Lindisfarne, with water tower on the left.

*In less than four months, on 18 September, Scotland goes to the polls to vote on the issue of Scottish independence. The question we’re being asked is ‘should Scotland be an independent country?’ If the majority of voters tick the ‘yes’ box, Scotland will cease to be part of the UK and become an independent country within the European Union.

Categories: Coffee, Earl Grey tea, England, Gardens, Photography, Scotland, Tea, Tearooms, Travel | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 42 Comments

Bicycles in bloom

The pretty seaside town of Pittenweem sits on Scotland’s east coast, in the Kingdom of Fife.

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With its red-roofed, white-washed buildings and quiet streets, it’s a delightful place to take a stroll and relax on a sunny day.

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Last year, as part of Pittenweem in Bloom, a curious selection of old bicycles appeared throughout the town.

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Fisherman’s bike near the harbour.

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A cheery chap with a sack of potatoes outside the church.

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A bike selling eggs, although they’d all been snapped up when I walked past it.

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Little red bike that had apparently just come in from a swim.

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An artist’s bike with paintbrushes sticking out of paint pots attached to the frame.

Not all of the bikes were the right way up.

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Upside down bike harnessed to a tree in the main street.

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A question many bicycle owners consider at some point in their lives.

And at least one little bike had jumped up above street level.

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A surprisingly musical bicycle down a side street.

Pittenweem’s attractive ice cream shop had a bike secured outside the front door (you can only see the back wheel of it in the picture, I’m afraid).

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This next one had been fixed up with an unusual (if not terribly practical) set of square wheels:

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“The Flintstone Flyer”, a square wheeled oddity.

It was such a gloriously sunny day when I was snapping away at all these bikes that I felt I was somewhere considerably more exotic than the east coast of Scotland.

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A moment of disorientation – have I been transported to a Spanish island?

All of this bicycle business was pretty exhausting, but luckily revitalising victuals weren’t far away.

At the excellent Cocoa Tree Cafe, I fuelled up on an exquisite chocolate cake and a pot of cardamom tea:

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My treat came with a jug of single cream and I was very pleased with the little slug that formed when I poured the cream over the cake:

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My delightful assistant sated her hunger with a cream scone:

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*   *   *   *   *

If you’re ever mooching around in the Fife area wondering how to fill your time, I heartily recommend a trip to Pittenweem.

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A walk along the sea front makes for a pleasant bit of exercise, and while you’re dondering along be sure to keep an eye out for this appealing local resident.

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Categories: Architecture, Cake, Chocolate, Fife, Photography, Pittenweem, Scone, Scotland, Tea, Tearooms | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 48 Comments

Signs of spring and a surprising scone

Yesterday, the sun was shining gloriously in my part of the world.

Being keen to make the most of the fine weather, delightful assistant no.1 and I zipped off Kinross-wards, to the Loch Leven Heritage Trail.

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Loch Leven has quite a bit to offer the visitor.

Not only is it a nature reserve of particular interest to birders, but there’s a castle in the middle of the loch where Mary Queen of Scots was once held captive. You can visit the castle via a small boat trip.

There are over 12 miles of level paths round the loch which are ideal for walkers, cyclists, wheelchairs and motorised scooters.

Perhaps best of all, to my way of thinking, Loch Leven’s Larder – a tip top food stop – sits near the banks of the loch and provides the ideal place for a tasty luncheon.

In order to make the most of the facilities, we parked in the Larder’s car park and went for a brisk walk to work up our appetites.

Tall reeds were growing in the marshy land beside the loch:

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Their golden colour made me dream of summer.

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The delightful assistant spotted some silkily soft pussy willow catkins. We stopped and stroked them, in time honoured fashion.

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There were also some magnificent Scots pine trees, with their beautiful bark lit up by the sunlight:

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Our walk did the trick, giving us the appetites we needed. I was close to desperate for a bite of something by the time we were sitting in the cafe perusing the menu.

I opted for one of the soups of the day, kale and potato, which came with not one, but two, pieces of deliciously fluffy freshly baked bread:

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It was tasty, filling and no doubt very nutritious, and I enjoyed it immensely.

Delightful assistant no.1 also enjoyed her choice of toasted ciabatta with brie and chicken, which came with an interesting looking coleslaw and root vegetable crisps:

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Loch Leven’s Larder is one of those places that has rather a mindboggling selection of sweet treats, and on this occasion the desserts included a special pudding of plum and apple crumble with custard.

Despite the temptation of that, and many other delicious looking items, I couldn’t – as I rarely can – get past the idea of a scone.

The scone options were as follows: fruit, plain, cheese and….chocolate and marshmallow.

I’m pretty sure that before yesterday I had never seen a chocolate and marshmallow scone. Although I did waver for a moment between that and the fruit scone, I grasped the nettle and plunged into new territory.

I teamed it up with a decaf cappuccino, while the delightful assistant settled for a lovely pot of tea and a ‘little taste’ of my scone.

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I wasn’t at all sure how the marshmallow would manifest itself, but it appeared to be a sort of shiny hardened area that I’m afraid I haven’t photographed very well (it’s the slightly shiny bit beneath the pale bit to the left of the photo below):

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Was it a success, this teaming of chocolate and marshmallow in a scone?

Decidedly, yes.

I don’t know how many excellent dining experiences I’ve chalked up now at this fine establishment, but I can assure anyone looking for a decent scone near Kinross that they’re sure to find something highly satisfactory at Loch Leven’s Larder.

Categories: Birds, Bread, Chocolate, Coffee, Perthshire, Photography, Scone, Scotland, Tearooms, Wildlife | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 47 Comments

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