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Posts Tagged ‘Lettuce’

A week ago I published a post entitled How to write a novel, which wasn’t so much a set of instructions as an update on my progress with writing one. I was pleased with myself for having hit my first 10,000 words. In the week since then I have added absolutely nothing to it.

This morning I began re-reading the first page of what I’ve written, and discovered that it’s so mindbogglingly tedious that I can’t even reach the bottom of the page without yawning my head off and wishing I was watching paint dry. Is this because I’ve read it so often, or is it because it genuinely is mind-bogglingly tedious?

I’m not sure, but it puts me in the sticky situation of not knowing what to do next. I could put the first 10,000 words to the back of my mind, pick up where I left off and keep writing regardless, or I could completely start again, rehashing the whole thing from scratch, or I could give up on it altogether, and accept that I will never write a novel.

Just at this moment, giving up seems a) the most sensible, and b) impossible. Even if every word I write is utter drivel, I don’t think I can stop myself from having a go at bashing out chapters of the stuff. Although I do think most of what I’ve written so far is excruciatingly dull, something inside me can’t seem to give it up on it.

Given this sorry state of affairs, having a bit of a whinge on my blog seemed like a refreshing balm for the soul. In fact, I feel better already, and would like to now make up for my moaning with pictures of a nice lunch I had last month in the utterly splendid bookshop and cafe, ReadingLasses (it specialises in books by women writers – rather a clever name, don’t you think?), in the small town of Wigtown.

I’ve written before about this place (here), and my most recent visit – while on holiday in Galloway with the delightful assistants – was as pleasing as ever.

It was exceptionally busy the day we popped in for luncheon, there being a busload of about 30 American tourists just having shipped in, shortly to be followed by a second busload. Each of them wanted to pay for their own meal, which led to a great deal of queueing and till-side confusion when it came to settling the bills. The way the shop is laid out, there’s not much space at the till area, indeed if you have more than one punter standing there it feels a tad cramped. We were seated near the till and the spectacle of politely shuffling tourists, peering at their strange currency and trying to remember what they’d eaten and therefore wanted to pay for, afforded us great entertainment. A small dog, that I think lives in the shop, added to the hullabaloo by getting in amongst the feet of punters and waitresses, and was clearly much excited by the sociable atmosphere.

I had been hoping for the shepherdess pie I had on my last visit here, but it wasn’t on the menu, so I plumped for a delicious sounding three bean chilli (vegan, to boot) instead. It came with crisp French bread, tortilla chips and some lettuce. The chilli was extremely hot, but the side items and a lovely glass of cool tap water helped to cool down my burning mouth. It was tasty and satisfying:

Thanks to it being, although quite substantial, also fairly light, I had room for a pudding. The puddings here are as good as the main courses, and I was tempted by the rice pud I had enjoyed previously, but then I remembered the chocolate brownie.

On the whole, I’m not much of a one for brownies, being suspicious of the sort of uncooked texture of the middle, but I had tasted one here before and recalled how exquisite it was. I took the plunge. It was served hot with ice cream, and I paired it rather decadently with an excellent decaf cappuccino:

I don’t know if that appeals to you or not, but I wish I could let you taste it. It exceeded my expectations, and even now I can lapse into a state of bliss just thinking of how the chocolate melted on the tongue and how the texture and warmth seemed to nourish my blood and make me fitter, stronger, and almost invincible. (This might be stretching things a bit, but it did make me feel magnificent, despite its artery-clogging potential.)

I can’t resist another picture of it, to emphasise the pleasure:

Delightful assistant no.1 also indulged in a dessert, and the rice pudding called to her. It was, to be truthful, more a plate of cream with some rice in it, which exactly suited her tastes:

And so, when I feel useless and unable to achieve what I’ve set out to do in the novel-writing department, at least I know I still have the ability to consume and enjoy delicious fare. Not perhaps the world’s greatest ever achievement, but eminently satisfying for me all the same.

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Yesterday my lovely assistant and I headed off to one of our many local antiques centres to take morning refreshments. It’s not just one antique shop, this place, it’s like a huge aircraft hangar full of different antiques companies, each selling their wares in their own little area. There are specialist sellers of furniture, books, pictures, jewellery, ornaments, postcards, clothing, china, cutlery, and a lot more besides.

It’s so big that my assistant and I, having mooched off in different directions for a while, then spent about 10 minutes just trying to find each other again. There was no mobile phone reception so we couldn’t even text or ring each other. Fortunately, they have a tannoy system so if I hadn’t found her when I did I might have gone to the front desk and ask them to put a call out; I feel sure this must happen to missing companions frequently.

Anyway, before all that happened we took ourselves into the tearoom:

I only had my mobile phone camera on me, but I snapped away all the same. The cafe here is more of a restaurant really, with a large dining area and a very nice lunch menu, but there are a few sofas as well, and we flopped onto a couple of them and ordered English breakfast tea (me), an Americano (my delightful assistant) and a cream scone between us. The nice waitress even brought us an extra plate and extra cutlery:

Cream scones are not something I allow myself to have very often, but I just felt in need of a little treat on this occasion, and since we were sharing one it wasn’t so bad. I was a bit unsure about the cream at first, it being that air-filled fluffed up stuff, but in fact it slipped down a treat with the strawberry jam.

En route to the toilets, I noticed some antlers being put to good use:

After our refreshments, and before we lost each other, we enjoyed a leisurely amble round some of the antiques stalls. Quite often when I’m out for a walk, especially on a warm summer’s day nowhere near a tearoom, or sitting in the garden feeling extremely lazy, I dream of having a butler appear out of nowhere with tea on a silver tray, something like this:

Ideally I would like him to present me with a pretty cake stand full of small sandwiches, scones and dainty cakes, but failing that I might be interested in chocolate bars full of sweets:

Especially the one full of chunks of Cadbury’s Twirl, although I worry that the background chocolate might not be as good as the Cadbury’s bits:

On the way out of the antiques centre I passed this beautiful old till, which isn’t used as a till any more but adds a bit of class to the reception area:

I wanted to visit a tearoom in the very Scottish sounding town of Auchtermuchty and in order to work up an appetite for lunch we had a little walk in the hills above the town.

On our way to park the car on a quiet bit of road we passed a garden with a notice in it that caught my eye. I am very fond of rabbits and this little sign made my day:

I was quite surprised to find that they have a website (my assistant thought that perhaps it was put up by an indulgent parent with a rabbit-loving child) and that it appears to be a well established little business. The website contains advice about keeping rabbits that was completely new to me (although I’ve never kept real rabbits, myself). This advice includes the following:

“Your Rabbit needs daily exercise outdoors in the sunshine. Around 4 hours a day is best, maybe split up into morning and evening. Remember to give them a bolthole to run into if they want to hide and also a shady spot if they get too warm. Your rabbit may be cooler in their hutch in a shaded place in the garden when it is very hot. Supply some toys for them to play with, and lots of fresh water. Provide tunnels for them to play hide and seek and watch them have fun.”

Some of the toys suggested for rabbits are: old telephone books, plastic keys and rolled up newspaper. I was particularly surprised to learn that 99% of a rabbit’s diet should be hay and that you should not feed your rabbit with lettuce. I thought lettuce was a close second to carrots when it came to what bunnies like to munch, but it seems I’ve been misguided for all these years. Even carrots, apparently, should only be given in small amounts as a special treat.

Beyond the rabbit rescue place we had a walk along a small road. It was a very dull dark day but I took a few photos in the gloom:

I always like a dry stone wall:

I thought this looked an interesting house. It had a new bit added onto the right hand side, but I left that out of the photo because it didn’t really enhance the building, to my mind:

It was quite an energetic walk and by the end of it I was very ready for a bite to eat in Auchtermuchty.

It often astonishes me that people manage to get through the posts on this blog, because I’m afraid they do tend to drag on and become quite intolerably long. In light of that fact, I’m going to save the Auchtermuchty tearoom for a separate entry.

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This week’s Tearoom of the Week comes to you from the Kingdom of Fife. As my delightful assistant and I were driving through Fife the other day I wondered why Fife is known as the ‘Kingdom of Fife’. Apparently it goes back to Pictish times (about 2000 years ago) when Scotland was divided into 7 kingdoms. Fife was one of them and for some reason the name ‘Kingdom of Fife’ has stuck, although it’s the only one we still refer to in that way.

The tearoom in question is a favourite of mine that I’ve been using as a carrot to help me finish my self-imposed task of collecting tearooms in the areas of Perthshire, Angus and Dundee. It’s so close to Perthshire that I’ve often been tempted to sidle into it over the past few weeks, but somehow I’ve managed to keep away until now.

What could be better than a tearoom that grows its own food? That’s precisely what happens in this place, for it’s attached to an organic farm. The farm was established in 1983 and grows a wide variety of salad items and vegetables, and produces lots of free range eggs from its 150 hens. The tearoom is fully organic and vegetarian, with most of the menu items being available as vegan and gluten free options. Here’s what greets you when you’ve bumped down a rough pothole-filled track:

The outside decking area has been built around a tree:

It was a bit chilly for sitting outside, not to mention a tad damp and very windy, so we headed indoors and found a nice little table for two tucked in a corner with pretty cushions on the chairs:

As soon as you open the door to this place your senses are assaulted. It has the kind of earthy smell you often get in healthfood shops, a creative mixture of herbs and spices, and right inside the front door is a magnificent array of fresh and organic fruit and vegetables:

Once you’ve successfully negotiated the fresh produce you’re hit with lots of other exciting things on shelves, many of which are edible. In addition to freshly baked bread, packets of biscuits, interesting chocolate and the many other food and drink items, there are organic shampoos, soaps, brushes, detergents and all sorts of other environmentally friendly products:

The whole place has a rustic, healthy, wholesome feel about it and it always makes me (and other customers, by the look of the lady below)  happy to wander round the shop or sit in the cafe.

One of my favourite menu items here is the salad, and I’m sure there’s nowhere else I’ve been that serves a fresher salad with fewer food miles. My assistant and I both chose the salad, with oatcakes for me and seeded bread for her (rice cakes are another option):

I was particularly surprised by the broccoli, which is not normally one of my favourite vegetables, but was prepared to perfection in this salad bowl. I could very happily have eaten a whole bowl of this broccoli, which I find quite astonishing. Every time I’ve been the salads have been different, because the ingredients change with the seasons. This is the way we should eat food, I suppose.

After a most delicious lunch, which included some excellent Rooibos tea for me and a glass of sweet cloudy apple juice for my assistant, we had a look round the shop and I bought a toothbrush, and three replacement heads (for the toothbrush, that is):

One thing I was tempted to buy, but didn’t, was some of the beautiful earthenware they had on display. The glaze was sort of pearlescent and I thought some of the individual pieces were very attractive. I was particularly keen on the domed butter dish towards the bottom right of this picture, which I thought was a most pleasing shape:

Some of the bowls had a magnificent lustre:

Before tootling away from this organic haven of healthiness, I visited the facilities, which are situated in what is more or less a large garden shed:

The somewhat basic privy arrangements might not please everyone, but I quite like them because they remind me of happy childhood camping holidays.

I feel I’ve come to the end of this tale, but the only problem with finishing here is that when this post is put onto my Facebook page it displays the last photograph. I have a feeling that ‘Tearoom of the Week (5)’ and then a picture of a toilet might not inspire many people to read on, so here’s a salad I had at the same tearoom last year instead:

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